Prairie Public History

For more than 40 years, Prairie Public Broadcasting has been committed to strengthening the prairie community and helping rural communities remain viable by using its advanced technology and broadcast capabilities. Headquartered in Fargo, North Dakota, Prairie Public Broadcasting is a non-profit organization and community licensee that provides public television services throughout North Dakota, northwestern Minnesota, southern Manitoba, and parts of Montana and South Dakota, and public radio service to North Dakota. In addition to broadcasting services, Prairie Public Broadcasting provides a wide range of educational and technological services to communities and individuals across its coverage area. Thanks To You!

1959
Prairie Public takes its first step from dream to reality as North Central Educational Television is incorporated, thanks to the vision of Dr. Ted Donat.

1960s
A time of social change and unrest, the ’60s also sees the beginnings of a new concept — Public Television. With the creation of PBS, KFME (the first station in the network that will become Prairie Public) begins broadcasting nationally produced public television programs. More

1970s
In the ’70s, Prairie Public Television is formed — one transmitter at a time — one dollar at a time. With the persistent persuasion of educators, broadcasters, and public television members, state funding and support for public television is finally acquired, allowing public television to expand beyond the Red River Valley. More

1980s
As the vision for Prairie Public expands, the ’80s brings Prairie Public Radio to western North Dakota and sees the construction of the statewide television network. More

1990s
At Prairie Public, the ’90s are a decade of innovation and of an exploration of new, alternative channels of programming. Documentaries, news, and informational projects abound on television and radio and garner many national awards. More

2000s
With digital television on the horizon, Prairie Public focuses on the exciting challenge of building a new infrastructure and re-imagining programming for the new world of digital broadcasting. More

2010s
The digital future has arrived, and Prairie Public is broadcasting four multicast television streams, three multicast radio streams, and is offering a host of content online and on mobile devices. More

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