3589 search Results for: datebook

  • Traveling Jenny

    Datebook listeners may recall the story of Traveling Jenny that aired back in April of 2007. Traveling Jenny was a cow on the Two Bar Ranch in Dunn County, part of a cattle herd owned by William Connolly. Many a time the Connolly cowhands had attempted to rope and brand Jenny, but she wasn’t about […]

  • The Fighting Chaplain

    Tucked in a plastic sleeve among many other objects and many other shelves in the State Historical Society of North Dakota museum lower-level, is a piece of sheet music. Entitled “Our Fighting Chaplain,” the music was written and played by the 116th Engineers Band. The band was no ordinary band and the chaplain, no ordinary […]

  • Stutsman County Courthouse

    Built in 1883, six years before North Dakota became a state, the Stutsman County Courthouse is the oldest of its kind in North Dakota. For almost a century the beautiful red brick structure was the center of both Stutsman County politics and law, only replaced by a new building in the early 1980s. A one-of-a-kind […]

  • Valley City Village

    On this date in 1881, Valley City was incorporated as a village. It had four other names before getting its final version. It was called Second Crossing of the Sheyenne when the Northern Pacific Railroad founded it in 1872. Probably because that was a bit wordy, it was soon renamed Fifth Siding and then renamed […]

  • Dust Bowl Diary

    On this date in 1932, Ann Marie Low spent the evening picking chokecherries. She watched the ducks along the river and the changing colors of the hills and fields, calling it her country. By the end of the decade though, the farm where she grew up would no longer feel like home. As the dust […]

  • Duck Census

    The Dust Bowl years not only rocked agriculture and society in the Midwest, but also the region’s ecosystem. As drought eliminated marshlands and turned soil into dry, wind-blown silt, different species, including waterfowl, felt the effects. On this date in 1935, the Killdeer Herald announced that the first wild duck census would be conducted in […]

  • Elderly Divorce

    Friends and family of a Grand Forks couple were reeling on this date in 1904; the couple, Edward and Katherine Fallen, had just announced they would be seeking a divorce. Normally, such a thing would cause little commotion, but the Fallens were over seventy years of age and had been married for over forty years! […]

  • Hot Summer

    1936 was the most brutal year in the climatological history of North Dakota. Farmers planted seeds with hopes of a good year, but by the end of May, the fields needed rain badly. Then came “the driest June since statewide records began in 1892.” July of 1936 was a disastrous month for crops, for it […]

  • Red Cross Nurses

    On this date in 1914, war had just erupted throughout Europe. North Dakotans were just as eager as the rest of the country to stay out of the conflict, but when the US made the decision to enter the Great War, North Dakotans lent a hand both at home and abroad. They volunteered for military […]

  • Grasslands

    Some stereotype North Dakota as a flat and treeless state. To contradict such ideas, one has only to point to the badlands in the west and to tree-lined rivers and the tree-covered hills of the northern border. Still there is certainly a unique type of terrain that crosses North Dakota: the grasslands. Today, North Dakota […]

  • Grasslands

    Some stereotype North Dakota as a flat and treeless state. To contradict such ideas, one has only to point to the badlands in the west and to tree-lined rivers and the tree-covered hills of the northern border. Still there is certainly a unique type of terrain that crosses North Dakota: the grasslands. Today, North Dakota […]

  • The Guilfords

    People in North Dakota, even today, often do not feel the need to lock their doors. While some feel protected by low crime rates, others buy security systems to protect their homes. Some simply put out a “Beware of Dog” sign whether or not they actually have a dog. Mrs. Guilford didn’t have a sign, […]

  • Bicycles Scorchers

    Grand Forks had a problem with bicycles in the 1890s. More specifically, the city had problems with bicycle riders who zipped along sidewalks, bobbing and weaving through pedestrians in what was called “scorching.” In 1897 a bicycle scorcher ran smack into Miss Emily Lister and knocked her down, rendering her “senseless.” The scorcher did not […]

  • Theatre in Minot

    On this date in 1953, The Minot Daily News proudly reported that Minot was growing. A number of buildings were in the works, including the construction of a new theater, “the most modern in (the) United States.” Plans for the theater, which would be largest in the state, were under copyright and could not be […]

  • Mistaken Identity

    The Mundy Carnival caused quite a stir visiting Fargo this week in 1904. In an effort to attract fairgoers, the carnival’s press agent published an account of one of the moving pictures playing as part of the show in the Fargo Forum. One of the characters in the picture was a man by the name […]

  • Harvest Datebook

    Soon the lush green fields of waving grain will take on a yellow hue and turn to gold as harvest nears. Then the large, lumbering combines will roll out, chewing up the grain and spitting out the straw. Within a few weeks, with good weather, harvest will near an end, but it wasn’t always that […]

  • Keeping Cool

    July is always the hottest month for North Dakotans and the hottest July ever recorded in the state’s history came in 1936. Just how difficult were the heat and concurrent drought conditions that summer? Well, the town of Steele, forty miles east of Bismarck, established a new all-time state record high of 121 degrees on […]

  • Moon Day

    In 1969, Americans watched as Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins set out to complete a fantastic journey to the moon. The first walk on the moon was scheduled for this date. In anticipation of this historical event, President Nixon sent out a request that on July 21, America would celebrate Moon Day as […]

  • The Poker Game

    But for a North Dakotan and a lucky hand of poker, World War Two may have had a different ending. Born in Minot, and a graduate of Annapolis, Joseph Enright received command of his own submarine, the USS Dace, in 1943. With orders to patrol a busy section near the Japanese mainland, he was certain […]

  • First Aeroplane Flight

    One hundred years ago, airplanes were called “aeroplanes,” and pilots were known as “aviators;” or as “birdmen” because they were flying like a bird. Powered flight, once just a dream, had become a reality. After the Wright Brothers flew successfully in 1903, the winds of change began to whisper across the nation. Brave souls answered […]