3640 search Results for: datebook

  • Red Cross Nurses

    On this date in 1914, war had just erupted throughout Europe. North Dakotans were just as eager as the rest of the country to stay out of the conflict, but when the US made the decision to enter the Great War, North Dakotans lent a hand both at home and abroad. They volunteered for military […]

  • Grasslands

    Some stereotype North Dakota as a flat and treeless state. To contradict such ideas, one has only to point to the badlands in the west and to tree-lined rivers and the tree-covered hills of the northern border. Still there is certainly a unique type of terrain that crosses North Dakota: the grasslands. Today, North Dakota […]

  • Grasslands

    Some stereotype North Dakota as a flat and treeless state. To contradict such ideas, one has only to point to the badlands in the west and to tree-lined rivers and the tree-covered hills of the northern border. Still there is certainly a unique type of terrain that crosses North Dakota: the grasslands. Today, North Dakota […]

  • The Guilfords

    People in North Dakota, even today, often do not feel the need to lock their doors. While some feel protected by low crime rates, others buy security systems to protect their homes. Some simply put out a “Beware of Dog” sign whether or not they actually have a dog. Mrs. Guilford didn’t have a sign, […]

  • Bicycles Scorchers

    Grand Forks had a problem with bicycles in the 1890s. More specifically, the city had problems with bicycle riders who zipped along sidewalks, bobbing and weaving through pedestrians in what was called “scorching.” In 1897 a bicycle scorcher ran smack into Miss Emily Lister and knocked her down, rendering her “senseless.” The scorcher did not […]

  • Theatre in Minot

    On this date in 1953, The Minot Daily News proudly reported that Minot was growing. A number of buildings were in the works, including the construction of a new theater, “the most modern in (the) United States.” Plans for the theater, which would be largest in the state, were under copyright and could not be […]

  • Mistaken Identity

    The Mundy Carnival caused quite a stir visiting Fargo this week in 1904. In an effort to attract fairgoers, the carnival’s press agent published an account of one of the moving pictures playing as part of the show in the Fargo Forum. One of the characters in the picture was a man by the name […]

  • Harvest Datebook

    Soon the lush green fields of waving grain will take on a yellow hue and turn to gold as harvest nears. Then the large, lumbering combines will roll out, chewing up the grain and spitting out the straw. Within a few weeks, with good weather, harvest will near an end, but it wasn’t always that […]

  • Keeping Cool

    July is always the hottest month for North Dakotans and the hottest July ever recorded in the state’s history came in 1936. Just how difficult were the heat and concurrent drought conditions that summer? Well, the town of Steele, forty miles east of Bismarck, established a new all-time state record high of 121 degrees on […]

  • Moon Day

    In 1969, Americans watched as Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins set out to complete a fantastic journey to the moon. The first walk on the moon was scheduled for this date. In anticipation of this historical event, President Nixon sent out a request that on July 21, America would celebrate Moon Day as […]

  • The Poker Game

    But for a North Dakotan and a lucky hand of poker, World War Two may have had a different ending. Born in Minot, and a graduate of Annapolis, Joseph Enright received command of his own submarine, the USS Dace, in 1943. With orders to patrol a busy section near the Japanese mainland, he was certain […]

  • First Aeroplane Flight

    One hundred years ago, airplanes were called “aeroplanes,” and pilots were known as “aviators;” or as “birdmen” because they were flying like a bird. Powered flight, once just a dream, had become a reality. After the Wright Brothers flew successfully in 1903, the winds of change began to whisper across the nation. Brave souls answered […]

  • Bacon and Eggs

    You’ve heard the phrase, “Hot enough to fry eggs on the sidewalk.” Maybe you’ve even experienced that sort of weather. It’s theoretically possible, but in practice, it’s much harder to accomplish; an egg needs to reach a temperature of 156 degrees to cook. But in July of 1936, with some of the hottest temperatures on […]

  • David Thompson Monument

    On this day in 1925, near Verendrye, the Great Northern Railway erected a spherical granite monument crisscrossed with latitude and longitude lines to honor David Thompson. Why David Thompson? After finishing a 13 year apprenticeship as a surveyor with the Hudson’s Bay Company, Thompson joined the Northwest Company in 1797. Alexander Mackenzie, Simon Fraser and […]

  • Capitol Air

    While North Dakota is perhaps better recognized for its blizzards and cold, the heat of the summer can be blistering. On this date in 1965, the Weather Bureau predicted that some of that heat would soon hit Bismarck with temperatures in the nineties – a change from what had been an otherwise cool summer. While […]

  • Battle of the Grand Coteau

    Throughout the early nineteenth century, the Métis stood as one of the most dominant people groups of the Red River Valley. Descended largely from Ojibwa or Cree mothers and European fathers, the Red River Métis were a fiercely independent people, noted as excellent horsemen, trappers, voyageurs and buffalo hunters. A large part of the Métis […]

  • Camp Sheardown

    Nearly 150 years ago, during the brutally hot summer of 1863, the army of General Henry H. Sibley struggled north through Dakota Territory. Their destination: Devils Lake, the reported campsite of Chief Little Crow’s band of Mdewakanton Santee Dakota held responsible for a series of violent raids against Minnesotan settlements a year earlier. Sibley and […]

  • Charley Talbott and the Farmers’ Union

    The 1930s were hard on North Dakota farmers. About the only thing that survived the dust storms and grasshoppers were Russian thistles. Cattle starved or fell dead with bellies full of dirt, and farm foreclosures became more and more frequent. An elevator man in Sanish thought the price of wheat hit rock bottom at 56 […]

  • Charging Bear Adopts Captain Welsh

    During the summer of 1913, an event near Fort Yates led to a full-page spread in the Minneapolis Sunday Journal, including photos and artwork. The story referred to Blackfeet/Hunkpapa Chief John Grass adopting Alfred Burton Welch, Captain in the U.S. Army, as his son. North Dakota historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard writes, “Adoption is one […]

  • Mail Carrier

    On this date in 1951, a breath of history entered the city of Fargo in the person of pioneer O.A. Vangsness. Vangsness lived in Milwaukee then, but he once served as the mail carrier in Kindred. He had retired twenty years prior, so he wasn’t carrying mail; he was carrying memories of the early development […]