2925 search Results for: datebook

  • Fort Laramie Treaty

    A treaty effective this date in 1868 was the culmination of bloodshed, battle and painful memories. It reflected the complicated aftermath of another civil war, not between North and South, but between the American government and the great Sioux nation. Following Indian Wars of the 1870s, the United States reclaimed 7.7 million acres of the [...]

  • Flowers

    In 1903, N. P. Lindberg, “a cigar maker, with a green thumb,” founded a greenhouse in Rugby, North Dakota. The business stayed in the family for the next several decades, and in 1960, even after Lindberg’s death, four generations were involved in learning about it and running it – from Lindberg’s 89-year-old widow to his [...]

  • Robinson’s History Book Re-published

    For many years there has been a key “go to” print source for information about North Dakota’s past. North Dakotans, with either a casual or intense curiosity about the heritage and historical perspective of their state, have benefited from Dr. Elwyn B. Robinson’s “The History of North Dakota” since its publication in 1966. Robinson chaired [...]

  • Hudson Bay Company Begins

    England’s King Charles II made a wise decision on this date involving the new world that created the Hudson Bay Company. The monarch granted a royal charter to an initial group of investors allowing them to trade in the Hudson Bay drainage basin in present day Canada. That act in 1670 would initiate the start [...]

  • Fargo’s Conflagration

    In 1874 the Headquarters Hotel was the pride and joy of Fargo. Built two years earlier by the Northern Pacific Railroad, it was touted as one of the finest hotels in the northwest. But on the morning of September 22, a fire broke out in the kitchen. Proving to be too much for the hotel [...]

  • Leon Jacobson

    It’s spring. The trees are budding, the flowers blossoming, the prairies blooming with emerald life. And children, long cooped up behind their brown and tan desks are eagerly anticipating the wondrous joy of the three months of glorious freedom shortly to come. Teachers – for their part – are likewise looking forward to the respite [...]

  • Big Tornado

    Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms, and the United States has 75 percent of the world’s tornadoes. Although no state wishes to be included on a list of tornado-related statistics, violent weather has a way of making its way into the history books. From 1950 through 2008, North Dakota has had at least two reported [...]

  • Charles Sevrinson

    Charles Sevrinson, long-time dean of students at NDSU, was born on this date in 1898 in Reynolds, North Dakota. Sevrinson attended Mayville State Teachers College before graduating with a degree in education from the University of North Dakota in 1924. He began teaching in a one-room schoolhouse near Reynolds, but was soon promoted to superintendent. [...]

  • Shakespeare Week

    The cities of Fargo and Moorhead were celebrating a week of festivities honoring William Shakespeare on this day in 1916. The festivities, including plays, parades, games, dances, and fireworks, were held as part of a nation-wide celebration honoring the three-hundred year anniversary of the English poet’s death. Although the exact date of the poet’s birth [...]

  • Prison Riot

    On this day in 1957, newspapers across the country were reporting a prison riot at the State Penitentiary in Bismarck the previous day. The trouble started late in the morning, when 220 prisoners refused to go back to work in the binder-twine factory. The convicts complained of poor food, about the actions of a particularly [...]

  • Ray Bell and Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear is the longest running public service campaign in the United States, with Smokey’s mission being to raise public awareness to prevent fires and protect our nation’s forests. But Smokey wasn’t the first “spokesanimal” speaking out for fire safety. After the release of the 1942 animated feature film, Bambi, Walt Disney temporarily loaned his [...]

  • Capturing the Confederate

    Men generally aren’t commended for trying to sneak a peak up a woman’s skirt, but one North Dakotan helped in a historic capture by doing so. That North Dakotan’s name was Arne Ranum, a young Norwegian man and Civil War soldier.   Ranum’s parents came to the United States in 1864, first settling in Wisconsin [...]

  • Rugby vs.The World

    “Rugby vs. The World:” It was a match for the history books. And a future North Dakotan played a key role. Various forms of football became widely popular in 19th century England; including rugby in its very earliest form. In the first half of the century it was spontaneous and uncomplicated. There were no written [...]

  • Orin G. Libby Papers

    The Orin G. Libby papers were deposited into UND’s Chester Fritz Library on this date in 1957. The donation from Eva, Libby’s widow, represents the collection of letters, manuscripts, academic publications and holdings of one of North Dakota’s greatest historians. As such, they provide an invaluable resource to students of history. The six boxes of [...]

  • Fort Lincoln Dramatic Association

    Military forts on the Northern Plains were lonely outposts lacking in most of the comforts and culture of the Eastern cities. Desertions due to boredom were common. Often the only form of entertainment was the post library or the local bars and bawdy houses that sprang up near the forts. Fort Lincoln had spawned its [...]

  • Archbishop in Nigeria

    On this day, May 14, 2001, the Archbishop of the Lutheran Church of Christ in Nigeria, David Windibiziri, addressed the congregation of Trinity Lutheran Church, north of Kenmare, ND. Although raised in the traditional religious beliefs of his home in Nigeria, Archbishop Windibiziri had as a teenager converted to Christianity and attended the Lutheran Seminary [...]

  • Talkies

    The joining of sound and picture had been in experimentation for many years before, but when the first well-known “talkie,” “The Jazz Singer,” was produced and shown in 1927, the movies were changed forever.   So in 1930, Walhalla was really keeping with the times when they installed talking equipment in their opera house. They [...]

  • Baseball

    On this date in 1905 in Mayville, Traill County, baseball was in the air. In fact, the sport was on the minds of the local youth to such an extent that they decided to form not just one team, but two! The second nine called themselves the Mayville White Caps, and, according to the local [...]

  • The Traveling Photo Studio

    A traveling photo studio managed by a famous photographer might seem like an innovative idea even in contemporary times. Just imagine its attraction in 1886 Dakota Territory. Frontier photographer F. Jay Haynes created such an enterprise to chronicle the life and times of prairie pioneers. After a trip to La Moure, he headed to his [...]

  • Harvey Carignan

    Harvey Carignan, also known as Harvey the Hammer or the Want-Ad Killer, was born on this date in 1927 in Fargo, North Dakota. Definitely one of North Dakota’s less publicized and celebrated sons, Carignan would go on to kill and brutalize at least five, and possibly as many as eighteen, victims. Born to a single [...]