2863 search Results for: datebook

  • Angela Gibson, Filmmaker

    Today is the birthday of filmmaker Angela Murray Gibson. Nobody is certain what year she was born, because she refused to reveal her age, and her tombstone reveals only the year she died – 1953. Best guess is that she was born in Scotland around 1878. During the Roaring ‘20s, American women gained independence and [...]

  • Limpy Jack Clayton

    (Audio intro: Ballad of Limpy Jack) That’s the Ballad of Limpy Jack, written by Tania Durham, a Jamestown native who has spent a number of years exploring the history of Limpy Jack Clayton, who died in a Jamestown hospital on this day in 1893. During his 60 years of wandering, Limpy made news wherever he [...]

  • San Juan Hill

    It was on this date in 1898 that Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders stormed Kettle Hill in Cuba, and then helped capture San Juan Hill. Four and a half months earlier, the Spanish had sunk the U.S.S. Maine in the Havana harbor, killing 260 American sailors, which led to the U.S. cry, “Remember the [...]

  • General Harold K. Johnson

    It was on this date in 1968 that General Harold K. Johnson finished his tenure as Army Chief of Staff, a position he held under President Johnson during the build-up of the Vietnam War. Dr. Lewis Sorley’s biography of Johnson describes him as hard working, determined, religious, intelligent and honorable – all traits that raised [...]

  • Gene Autry and His Colt

    On this day in 1949, singer and actor Gene Autry was in North Dakota to perform at the annual Mandan Rodeo with his backup band, the Cass County Boys – that’s Cass County, Texas, not North Dakota. The western movie star also collected a black colt from Mandan rancher Frank Wetzstein, which he bought the [...]

  • Grand Master of Fireworks

    The Rosten Thunder and Lightning Show in Tioga tonight had its origins in 1989 on Bruce Rosten’s farm outside of Wildrose. Rosten is a self-taught fireworks maker who has earned the title of Grand Master, the highest level a shell builder can attain within the International Pyrotechnics Guild. Rosten and his friends read up on [...]

  • Floyd Stromme, Pitcher

    In 1939, Floyd Stromme made his debut as a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, but his “first” debut happened eight years earlier as an adolescent playing for the Cooperstown Junior Legion baseball team. Oswald Tufte coached Cooperstown in 1931, and they had to cancel their season opener, because they didn’t enough money to buy a [...]

  • Colonel Lounsberry Scoops Bighorn

    It was on this date in 1876 that the world learned what happened eleven days earlier at the Little Bighorn. Colonel Clement Lounsberry was credited with scooping what has been called “one of the greatest stories in American journalism” when he released his famous Bismarck Tribune “extra.” Actually, two other newspaper reports had been written [...]

  • North Dakota’s First Mass Murder

    North Dakota’s first mass murder took place on this date in 1893. Six members of the Daniel Kreider family were killed on their farm southeast of Cando, including four of their 8 children. In the preceding years, Daniel and Barbara Kreider had moved to Cando from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, by way of Missouri, and appear [...]

  • Finding Fen-Phen

    It was on this date in 1997 that CNN broke the news that the miracle combination of diet drugs known as fen-phen was causing leakage in users’ heart valves. What many don’t know is that the first person to figure it out was a cardiac sonographer at Fargo’s MertitCare named Pam Ruff. According to an [...]

  • Eric Sevareid

    It was on this date in 1992 that one of the greatest newsmen of the 20th century died. Eric Sevareid’s career spanned 38 years, during which he shared the CBS Evening News with another broadcasting icon, Walter Cronkite. Sevareid was born in 1912 and grew up in Velva. He wanted to be a journalist and [...]

  • White Cloud

    According to a Native American legend, a traveling war party once came upon a very large herd of buffalo spread throughout a wide valley, and right in their midst laid a peaceful and beautiful buffalo of pure white. The war party realized that the other animals kept their distance, which was interpreted as a sign [...]

  • Fredonia and Sherwood

    At least nine North Dakota towns are celebrating their centennials this year. Fredonia was founded when the Soo Line Railroad was extending its line from Kulm to Lehr. In 1904, area volunteers, mostly farmers, built a sidetrack to a site they called Denevitz. A crew of Frenchmen built a grain elevator and store there that [...]

  • Charging Bear Adopts Captain Welsh

    During the summer of 1913, an event near Fort Yates led to a full-page spread in the Minneapolis Sunday Journal, including photos and artwork. The story referred to Blackfeet/Hunkpapa Chief John Grass adopting Alfred Burton Welch, Captain in the U.S. Army, as his son. North Dakota historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard writes, “Adoption is one [...]

  • Charley Talbott and the Farmers’ Union

    The 1930s were hard on North Dakota farmers. About the only thing that survived the dust storms and grasshoppers were Russian thistles. Cattle starved or fell dead with bellies full of dirt, and farm foreclosures became more and more frequent. An elevator man in Sanish thought the price of wheat hit rock bottom at 56 [...]

  • International Peace Gardens

    The International Peace Garden straddles the U.S.–Canadian border between Boissevain, Manitoba and Dunseith, North Dakota. It was on this date in 1932 that it was first dedicated. The idea for the Peace Garden began as the dream of a Canadian horticulturist, Dr. Henry J. Moore, a lecturer for the Ontario Department of Agriculture. Moore was [...]

  • Sibley Historic Sites

    The State Historical Society administers a good number of historic military sites throughout the state, many of which are small out-of-the-way spots that come with small brown road signs that point the way. Recently, our Dakota Datebook writer came upon one of these beside ND Hwy 1 near Binford. “I spotted it and asked my [...]

  • Ukranian Festival

    The Ukrainian Cultural Institute in Dickinson was founded in 1981, and has since grown from 50 to 500 members from 26 states and Canada. The Institute has been celebrating its annual Ukrainian Festival this weekend, including music and food – including “varenyky-pyrohy” or cheese buttons, arts and crafts including intricately hand-painted “Pysanky” or Ukranian Easter [...]

  • Cold Day in Beulah

    Looking back at the unseasonably cold weather this spring, it’s interesting to note the record high and low temperature that have been set at Theodore Roosevelt National Park over the years. For the months of February through September, every high record except one was set during the 1980s and ‘90s, while almost every cold record [...]

  • Georg Hildebrandt in the Gulag

    Today is the birthday of Georg Hildebrandt, who was born in 1911 in a German village in the Ukraine. In 1993, Hildebrandt’s book, “Why Are You Still Alive? A German in the Gulag,” was published in the German language. A German reviewer wrote, “Why are you still alive? That is the cynical question of a [...]