3144 search Results for: datebook

  • Wells County Comes Together

    The government of Wells County, North Dakota was organized on this date in 1884. The county was created 11 years earlier by the legislative session and named after fur trader Antoine Blanc Gingras. In 1881, Gingras County was renamed Wells County after Jamestown banker and legislator Edward Payson Wells.   Sitting in the center of […]

  • Illegal Fishing With Nets, 1914

    There was a time in Dakota Territory, when the bounty of nature seemed limitless, with countless buffalo, ducks and geese, along with endless grasslands and enough lignite-coal to last for centuries.  Even fish, in rivers, streams and lakes, appeared to be over-abundant, as it was written in 1885, of Devils Lake – its “supply of […]

  • War Fashions

    As the summer of 1941 passed by, the United States was still not at war.  That would come on December 8th, after Pearl Harbor.  But even though the country was still at peace, war was looming.  Canada announced that women could join the armed forces, although there was no plan to send them overseas.  In […]

  • Hidatsa Chief Drags Wolf

    The death of Hidatsa Chief Drags Wolf took place on this date in 1943. Only months before, he had vowed he would die before he watched his people’s land destroyed by the Garrison Dam – and he was true to his word. Drags Wolf was born in 1862 to Chief Crow Flies High and Peppermint […]

  • Sine Die

    In the waning days of the convention, the last of the major concerns were addressed.  Suffrage was partially adopted, with women voting in school-related elections only.  The Australian ballot issue, which involved printed ballots private voting, was sidestepped when E. A. Williams provided a substitute clause that required the legislature to pass legislation ensuring the […]

  • Defining “The Color Line” in North Dakota’s History

    The famous leader of the early civil rights movement in the US, W.E.B. DuBois said: “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” The divisions in America that came from slavery continued long after human bondage ended with the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. The color line dividing black and […]

  • The Last Quiet Day

    On this date in 1862, the Civil War was raging.  Battles had recently been fought at Memphis, Gaines Mill, and Malvern Hill.  But at Fort Abercrombie in North Dakota, it was just another dull day of sentry duty, herding cattle, and hauling water.  The Gateway to the West was far from the combat — no […]

  • Let’s Be Professional

    Today there is much hoot and holler about what a feminist is and what that means. While few Americans call themselves a feminist, most actually do support equality for the sexes, but that support wasn’t always so popular.  It took some courage for early feminists to take a stand, but they achieved a great deal. […]

  • Sheheke

    Two hundred and nine years ago this week, the Lewis and Clark expedition was back in familiar and friendly territory. They were on their return trip from the Pacific to St. Louis and had stopped for a few days to renew acquaintances with their Mandan and Hidatsa friends at the Knife River Indian villages. The […]

  • UND’s First Nickname

    To see the sprawling campus of the University of North Dakota today, it would be difficult to imagine the humble beginning of the institution and what the campus looked like in 1884. On February 23, 1883 the law was passed creating the University. On May 25th, ground was broken for the main building, but it […]

  • The Hell of High Water

    Twenty-two years ago the Red River Water Resources Council met on this date in Fargo to, in part, discuss the flood status of Devils Lake. North Dakota’s largest natural lake started to swell after heavy rains in spring 1993, and was already up two and a half feet. Major General David Sprynczynatyk, then North Dakota […]

  • Sam Crabbe’s Cows

    Sam Crabbe was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin in 1869.  He graduated from the University of Wisconsin as a civil engineer.  He worked for the city of Eau Claire, and later for a railway company.  In 1891 he arrived in Fargo.  He took charge of the first paving work in the city.  That was done […]

  • Harry J. Pearce

    When we picture high powered attorneys or the leaders of America’s many major corporations, we often think of the stereotype presented by Hollywood; a brash twenty something with East Coast roots, fresh out of an Ivy League college.  However, as is so often the case, such stereotypes are often inaccurate, and the real version is […]

  • Good Roads Movement

    The Good Roads Movement of the late 1800s and early 1900s sought to establish a good system of roads across the country. Originally, the movement was boosted more by bicyclists rather than motorists. However, as the car caught on, auto enthusiasts also saw the need for good roads. So did communities. The improvement in roads […]

  • State Mill

    The North Dakota State Mill was established in 1922, and it’s still going strong today. Around this time each year, the mill reports on its fiscal year, and in 2011 it reported a record profit – 22 percent higher than the record set the year before, and 705 percent more than the mill’s goal of […]

  • The Failed French Journey

    On this date in 1742, two French-Canadian explorers were making their way southwestward through North Dakota’s badlands. Louis-Joseph de la Vérendrye and his brother François, were the sons of Pierre Gaultier de la Vérendrye, the first known white man in the area that could become North Dakota. Little is certain about the brothers’ adventure. In […]

  • Cold War Reconnaissance Man

    During the Cold War, the United States actively monitored Soviet military activity around the globe, and on September 2, 1958, a nearly forgotten episode in history took the lives of 17 Air Force personnel. A C-130 aircraft left Incirlik Air Base near Adana, Turkey, on a supposedly routine flight. The aircraft had a front-end crew […]

  • End of the Line on the Dakotas’ Border

    The weather was bright and hot when an expert U.S. surveyor and his team finished marking the North Dakota-South Dakota border on this date in 1892. Split along the seventh standard parallel, the Dakotas are marked every half-mile by quartzite monuments. Over 700 originally lined the boundary. Only a few hundred remain today. Surveyor Charles […]

  • The Spitball Pitcher for Grand Forks, Steve Morse

    A long time ago, pitcher Steve Morse was a “spit ball artist” for the Grand Forks Flickertails baseball team.     On this date in 1912, the Grand Forks Herald reported that Morse and the Flickertails had lost a tough game to Duluth, 6 to 4, but the paper didn’t blame Morse, saying the “young gentleman […]

  • Trapshooting

    Trapshooting is one of three sports that involve shooting clay targets.  The sport can be traced back to 1750 in England.  The first American competition was documented in 1831.  Trapshooting was developed to provide practice for bird hunters.  Originally, live pigeons were used.  The sport is called trapshooting because the live birds were released from […]